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What if the warnings or reprimands were not for the same type violations as the one which occasioned the claimant's discharge? Even so, the discharge would be for misconduct if the claimant's conduct, viewed in its entirety, evinced a deliberate disregard of the employer's interests. For example, a claimant may have been warned several times over a period of two or three months because of such violations as arguing with coworkers, wandering away from the work station to engage in conversations, and failure to follow instructions. If, shortly after the last warning, the claimant violated an employer rule relative to tardiness by appearing at work 20 minutes late without good cause and was thereupon discharged, the discharge would be for misconduct.

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And applaud the

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Even had the claimant not been a guard, however, the claimant should be held ineligible as he deliberately asked someone to falsify his time card.

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The discharge was for misconduct. The claimant deliberately violated a reasonable employer rule which he was aware of. Moreover, by making those unauthorized long distance and lengthy personal calls, he in effect was stealing from the employer.

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The proposed rule would make several changes to (c)(2)(i). The proposed rule would revise (c)(2)(i) by dividing it into several smaller paragraphs. The proposed rule would revise (c)(2)(i) to include only the first two sentences of the current (c)(2)(i), which concern the right of the party subject to an immediately effective order to challenge the immediate effectiveness of that order. The proposed rule would further revise the first sentence to add a cross reference to (a)(5) and make other minor, clarifying editorial changes to that sentence.

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The proposed rule would redesignate the third sentence of the current (c)(2)(i) as a new paragraph, (c)(2)(iii), which would concern the staff's response to a motion challenging the immediate effectiveness of an order. The proposed (c)(2)(iii) would authorize the NRC staff to present its response through live testimony rather than a written response in those cases where the presiding officer orders live testimony.

This was a deliberate design decision to avoid upsetting players whose gender or sexuality would have been problematical in the Victorian era.

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The Cardassian justice system is based around the notion that the state is infallible and therefore anyone accused must be guilty and the entire trial process is nothing more than an elaborate prelude to confession and sentencing.

(2) Deliberately submit to the NRC, the Corporation, or its contractor or subcontractor, information:

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(3) An intentional act or omission that the person subjectively believes has a high probability of causing a violation described in paragraph (c)(1) or (c)(2) of this section, but the person takes deliberate action to remain ignorant of whether the act or omission causes or would have caused, if not detected, such a violation.

in the movie, Moses killing a slave master is accidental, according to the religious texts Moses did it deliberately).

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Similarly, the proposed rule would revise paragraph (b) of and paragraph (d) of ; these paragraphs define the term “deliberate misconduct” for those regulations. The proposed rule would revise the introductory text of paragraph (b) and the language of paragraphs (b)(i)-(ii) for , and the introductory text of paragraph (d) and the language of paragraphs (d)(1)-(2) for . These revisions are editorial in nature and support, in terms of readability and clarity, the addition of a new paragraph (b)(iii), for , and the addition of a new paragraph (d)(3), for . New paragraphs, (b)(iii) and (d)(3), would expand the definition of “deliberate misconduct” to include an intentional act or omission that the person subjectively believes has a high probability of causing a violation, but the person takes deliberate action to remain ignorant of whether the act or omission causes or would have caused, if not detected, such a violation.