DOWN AND OUT IN PARIS AND LONDON

The coffee here is the result of experience and training, tasting and smelling, investment in hardware and in relationships with producers. The three young entrepreneurs who set up the Brûlerie have travelled the world for the expertise to create a sophisticated Parisian coffee brand, banishing Paris's association with industrial coffee providers who demand a 20-year contract with their outlets. On Saturdays, you can book ahead online for an hour-long €20 coffee 'dégustation', which includes a bag of beans to take away.

Down and Out in Paris and London

Down and Out in Paris and London, by George Orwell, free ebook

Down and Out in Paris and London was George Orwell's first book

Somewhat underrated in terms of the city's more known attractions, Les Passages Couverts around the Grand Boulevards are atmospheric old covered passages that date from the 18th and 19th centuries. Glass-roofed and utterly charming, their second-hand bookshops, tea-rooms and gift boutiques make fun alternatives to stores elsewhere in Paris – especially the Gallerie Vivienne and the Passage Jouffroy, which houses the , Paris’s answer to Madame Tussauds.

Down and Out in Paris and London - Exeunt Magazine

Somewhat underrated in terms of the city's more known attractions, Les Passages Couverts around the Grand Boulevards are atmospheric old covered passages that date from the 18th and 19th centuries. Glass-roofed and utterly charming, their second-hand bookshops, tea-rooms and gift boutiques make fun alternatives to stores elsewhere in Paris – especially the Gallerie Vivienne and the Passage Jouffroy, which houses the , Paris’s answer to Madame Tussauds.

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Down and Out In Paris and London by Claire Tierney on Prezi

Founded in 1896, Bouillon Chartier (housed in a former railway station) expresses all the charm of Belle Epoque Paris. If you can last through the queue, it’s the perfect mood-booster: uniformed waiters scurry around, your neighbour will probably try to engage you in conversation, and American couples loudly discuss the merits of their saucission ardéchois. A vast menu covers everything you could ever want from a Parisian brasserie: snails, oeuf mayonnaise, andouillette with mustard, several types of steak frites and bargain wine. The wallet-friendly prices and jolly art deco brouhaha has well and truly won our hearts.

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"All the characters....in both parts of the book are intended more as representative types than as individuals"
Are these characters representative or individuals?
Do we think these characters existed?
eccentricities
Task - pairs or group of 4

Character profiling - guiding questions


Class feedback
Unnamed narrator in Down and Out - what is the intended effect of this?
Everyman character of narrator
1st person narration - point of view and reportage
Characteristics of the narrator?
educated
young
capable
critical of governments and religion
open minded with people
friendly and loyal at times
will look after himself if he has to

InSight Seminar - Down and Out in Paris and London 4.3.15 on Vimeo

David Pearson designs new series of George Orwell books - Design Week

Food in London can be dreadful, and can be fantastic (generally if money is no object.) However, unlike Paris where you're guaranteed decent food for about £10 a head, in London be prepared to spend double that - and the quality varies so much you can't just walk in and expect to eat well, unless you're from America's 'fly-over states'... Outside London the picture is bleak indeed. It's not that the Brits can't cook: we have a fine array of great chefs and some of the best restaurants in the world (the Fat Duck in Bray outside London vies with El Bulli in Spain for that title, and the deputy chefs from both restaurant have their own establishments now in South East London) it's just that to eat well costs so much. Think £50/$90 a head and then some at a good restaurant, or one that's any way near fashionable. We think the best strategy is simply to survive without injuring your wallet or digestive system. If your visit to London is part of a European tour, save gastronomy for France, where it's cheaper. That said there are a number of perfectly good, cheapish (for Britain) restaurants where we eat regularly - you'll undoubtedly meet us there if you follow our advice.
Few of the expensive restaurants make the grade internationally - for those that do, browse or at your local bookstore (or online see our guidebooks page) - we contribute to their reviews annually, and unlike Zagat they don't give points for attractive waiters. Tourist-orientated restaurants, which include the venerable 'Simpsons on the Strand' are usually dire even by UK standards.

Another thing we deplore about London is the absence of any real cafes - the late lamented Dome chain excepted. There are more coffee bars (Starbucks, Nero, Costa, etc) per square mile than we've seen anywhere, the latest tally was 2000. In fact we found Seattle a coffee desert compared to London. Most operate on the MacDonalds' fast turnaround principle, though increasing competition is forcing them to smarten up their act. The coffee is good but we miss the atmosphere of cafes in Vienna or Paris. A good newcomer that's bucking the trend is Cafe@, which is spreading from its base in the East End (on Brick lane), to the South East (Trendy Bermondsey st - where our offices are) good fairtrade coffee, good vibe, great music. Recommended - it's definitely our favourite.