Violence against Women Poverty or fear of poverty keeps ..

Few places need help more. Not only is West Center City one of the most violent areas, more than 1 in 10 properties are registered as vacant, and property owners owe the city $1.8 million in unpaid taxes.

Facts, info, and stats on teen violence and violent teens

Lead exposure and poverty: Have we gotten "youth violence" all wrong

Teen pregnancy is strongly linked to poverty, ..

Immigrants’ use of welfare after welfare reform: Cross-group comparison.
Lim, Y. & Resko, S. M. (2002). Journal of Poverty, 6(4), 63-82.
The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWOR) of 1996 represented a significant shift in U.S. public policy, rendering immigrants ineligible for most federal means-tested programs. The authors used the 1999 Current Population Survey (CPS) data set to provide the cross-sectional description of immigrants’ use of public transfer programs, particularly focusing on Asian American immigrants. Little is currently known about the economic well-being of Asian immigrants and their program participation in the wake of recent welfare reform. This research contributes to the knowledge of Asian immigrants’ reliance on public assistance and their sociodemographic characteristics in comparison with other racial/ethnic groups. (This is one of five articles in this special issue on inequality among Asian Americans.)

teen violence - School Shootings

Introduction: Pressing issues of inequality among Asian American communities.
Kilty, K. M., Segal, E. A. & Kim, R. Y. (2002). Journal of Poverty (entire-issue), 6(4), 1-3.
Race and ethnicity figure prominently in analyses of poverty and inequality in this country. The extent of poverty, whether for individuals, families, or children, has been well-documented for Native Americans, African Americans, and Latinos. The profound impact of discrimination and limitations on opportunities for these groups has also received considerable attention. Yet there is one exception to this examination of poverty and inequality: Asian Americans. To a large extent, that is due to the belief that Asian Americans represent the “model minority” in American society, and that they illustrate how well the American Dream really works for those who are willing to apply themselves. In contrast to other racial and ethnic groups, Asian Americans represent a group that has worked hard to achieve success in this society. They go to school and earn degrees that allow them to enter well paying professional occupations or start their own businesses and put in the long hours necessary to ensure success. (This special issue contains five articles that examine aspects of poverty and inequality for Asian Americans in this society.)

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The psychology of poverty: Professional social work and aid to dependent children in postwar America , 1946-1963.
Curran, L. (2002, September). Social Service Review, 76(3), 365-386.
Through a primary source analysis of professional and academic social work writings, this article describes how post World War II (1946 to 1963) social work researchers, educators, and clinical theorists adopted a psychological discourse to explain welfare use among single mothers. Faced with a postwar backlash against the federal entitlement program for single mothers and their children, Aid to Dependent Children, social work scholars drew on psychological narratives to protect recipients against charges of immorality and restrictive state measures. Armed with this new paradigm, many social workers theorized a distinct psychology of poverty, carved out a professional niche, and called on the federal government to provide individualized, quasi-therapeutic services to its constituency.

Poverty | Social Work Policy Institute

Poverty level and school performance: Using contextual and self-report measures to inform intervention.
Chapman, M. V. (2003, January). Children and Schools , 25(1), 5-17.
Delineating how the social context affects their school clients may be difficult for many school social workers. This article presents a simple statistical approach, accessible to master’s level practitioners, to incorporate the effect of the social context of poverty in intervention planning. This study is a cross-sectional investigation of associations between students’ perceptions of their social environment and academic outcomes. A series of Pearson correlation matrices was used to assess the effect of low, moderate, and high levels of poverty on these associations. The results suggest that contextual factors influence students over and above their perceptions of their environment and demonstrate the value of considering the social context in which a student lives when choosing interventions.

Poverty Causes Crime? Meet White Appalachia | …

Beyond welfare or work: Teen mothers, household subsistence strategies, and child development outcomes.
Almgren, G., Yamashiro, G. & Ferguson, M. (2002, September). Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, 29(3), 125-149.
There is probably no aspect of the work versus welfare debate that is more contested than the effects of welfare use on child development outcomes. Liberals tend to emphasize the detrimental effects of poverty and welfare stigma on children, while conservatives cite the negative socialization that occurs regarding the value of work within welfare-dependent families. However, large-scale longitudinal studies that have been used to address this question only indirectly measure critical influences on child development, such as maternal mental health, and do not consider the effect that a range of economic strategies that low-income mothers might undertake may have on their children. In this analysis, the authors employ data from a longitudinal study of 173 teen mothers to assess the relative effects of maternal characteristics and economic strategies on the developmental outcomes of their children at time of school entry. Two principal findings emerge. First, over the period from their first teen birth to the reference child’s entry into school, the sample subjects used a variety of household economic strategies aside from the simple welfare versus work dichotomy that is commonly used to depict the choices of teen mothers. Second, while maternal depression appears linked to the prevalence of problem behaviors in early childhood, the particular economic strategies used by the mothers in the sample do not explain any variation in either the prevalence of problem behaviors or in children’s learning preparation for school entry. These findings support the perspective that the influence of teen mothers’ parenting qualities on child development cannot be assessed through an analysis of their labor force participation, use of welfare, or other strategies of household subsistence.