The Book Of Amos Reveals Amazing ..

Many scholars break the book of Amos up into three sections. Chapters one and two look at the nations surrounding Israel and then Israel itself through an ethical lens. Chapters three to six are a collection of verses that look more specifically at Israel's transgressions. Chapters seven to nine include visions that gave Amos as well as Amaziah's rebuke of the prophet. The last section of the book (7:1 to 9:8), commonly referred to as the Book of Visions, contains the only narrative section. In the first two visions, Amos is able to convince Yahweh not to act out the scenes of discipline presented to him. The ideas of discipline and justice, although not enacted here, correspond to the central message in what some refer to as the Book of Woes (5:1 to 6:14). This message can be seen most clearly in verse 24 of chapter five. The plagues in the preceding chapter, chapter four, were supposed to be seen as acts of discipline that turned Israel back to Yahweh. However, the people did not interpret the acts this way, and the discipline turned into judgment for the people's disobedience. In the second set of visions (7:7-9) there is no intercession by Amos, and Yahweh says that he "will never pass by them again." The plight of Israel has become hopeless. God will not hold back judgment because Israel refuses to listen to the prophets and even goes so far as to try to silence them (2:12, 3:8, 7:10-17).

The book of Exodus is not primarily about the Exodus

The Book of Amos is one of the books of the  (Hebrew:

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Amos was a during the reign of Jeroboam ben Joash (), ruler of Israel from 793 BC to 753 BC, and the reign of Uzziah, King of Judah, at a time when both kingdoms (Israel in the North and Judah in the South) were peaking in prosperity. He was a contemporary of the prophet , but likely preceded him. Many of the earlier accounts of prophets found in the Old Testament are found within the context of other accounts of Israel's history. Amos, however, is the first prophet whose name also serves as the title of the corresponding biblical book in which his story is found.

Ken Raggio teaches the Book of Amos

Amos was the first biblical prophet whose words were recorded in a book, an older contemporary of Hosea and . He was active 750 BC during the reign of Jeroboam II. He lived in the kingdom of but preached in the northern kingdom of . His major themes of social justice, 's omnipotence, and divine judgment became staples of .

Without dispute, the Book of Amos has been accepted as canonical by , the , , and .

New Beginnings Ministry, Inc. Study in the Book of Amos Chapter 3

The word "genesis" means "beginning." In this first book of the Bible, the Lord reveals the beginnings of creation, the sabbath, humanity, marriage, sexuality, sin, suffering, murder, and alienation. These beginnings are treated in the first ten chapters. The next forty chapters are concerned with the beginning of the chosen people. After the devastation of the Babylonian exile, the people are going back to their roots to see if they are really the chosen people. If your life has fallen apart, go back to the "genesis" of God's work in your life.

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This book is the center of the Pentateuch (the first five books of the Bible). It reveals the answer to the problem of our fallen human nature: We must make atonement for our sins through a vicarious sacrifice. Instead of sacrificing ourselves, we can substitute the offerings of animals and cereal. Vicarious sacrifice was eventually the way of our atonement, redemption, justification, and salvation. However, animals can not substitute for human beings, "because it is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take sins away" (Heb 10:4). Only the sacrificial death of a man and the shedding of divinely precious blood can make atonement for all the sins of the world.

The Old Testament concludes with the twelve minor prophets. It's best to read them all together, like twelve chapters of one book.

OUTLINE OF THE BOOK OF AMOS - Children's Bible Study

The book of Exodus is not primarily about the Exodus. The plagues and the departure from Egypt are only an introduction to the book's final sixteen chapters, which deal with the Dwelling of God and its furnishings. This emphasis on the dwelling was an Israelite way of saying that the worship of God is the essence and goal of life. We are freed from Egypt's slavery and freed for worship at God's throne in Spirit and in truth (Jn 4:24).

What is the general theme of Amos?

The book of Exodus is not primarily about the Exodus. The plagues and the departure from Egypt are only an introduction to the book's final sixteen chapters, which deal with the Dwelling of God and its furnishings. This emphasis on the dwelling was an Israelite way of saying that the worship of God is the essence and goal of life. We are freed from Egypt's slavery and freed for worship at God's throne in Spirit and in truth (Jn 4:24).

The-Book-of-Amos - 4. Contents, main themes and messages

This book is the center of the Pentateuch (the first five books of the Bible). It reveals the answer to the problem of our fallen human nature: We must make atonement for our sins through a vicarious sacrifice. Instead of sacrificing ourselves, we can substitute the offerings of animals and cereal. Vicarious sacrifice was eventually the way of our atonement, redemption, justification, and salvation. However, animals can not substitute for human beings, "because it is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take sins away" (Heb 10:4). Only the sacrificial death of a man and the shedding of divinely precious blood can make atonement for all the sins of the world.